Oct 31

Tea Leaves & $2000 Gold

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Yes, some people are still forecasting $2000 gold by year’s end…
 

BOB and BARB Moriarty launched 321gold.com over 10 years ago, adding 321energy.com the better to cover oil, natural gas, gasoline, coal, solar, wind and nuclear energy as well as precious metals.
 
Previously a US Marine fighter pilot, and holding 14 international aviation records, Bob Moriarty here tells The Gold Report why he’s 100% certain that a market crash is looming… 
 
The Gold Report: Bob, in our last interview in February, we had currency devaluation in Argentina and Venezuela, interest rate hikes in Turkey and South America, and a cotton and federal bond-buying program. Just eight months later in October, we’ve got Ebola, ISIS and Russia annexing Crimea plus a rising US Dollar Index. We’ve also got pullbacks in gold, silver and pretty much all commodity prices. With all this news, what, in your view, should people really be focusing in on?
 
Bob Moriarty: There is a flock of black swans overhead, any one of which could be catastrophic. The fundamental problems with the world’s debt crisis and banking crisis have never been solved. The fundamental issues with the Euro have never been solved. The world is a lot closer to the edge of the cliff today than it was back in February.
 
About ISIS, I think I was six years old when my parents pointed out a hornet’s nest. They said, “Whatever you do, don’t swat the hornets’ nest.” Of course, being six years old, I took stick and went up there and swatted the hornets’ nest, which really pissed off the hornets. I learned my lesson.
 
We swatted the hornets’ nest when we invaded Iraq and Afghanistan. What we did is we empowered every religious fruitcake in the world. We said, “Okay, here’s your gun, go shoot somebody. We’ll plant flowers.” We are reaping what we sowed. What we need to do is leave them to their own devices and let them figure out what they want to do. It’s our presence in the Middle East that is creating a problem.
 
TGR: Will stepping back allow the Middle East to heal itself, or will there be continued civil wars that threaten the world?
 
Bob Moriarty: We are the catalyst in the Middle East. We have been the catalyst under the theory that we are the world’s policemen and that we’re better and smarter than everybody else and rich enough to afford to fight war after war. None of those beliefs are true. The idea that America is exceptional is hogwash. We’re not smarter. We’re not better. We’re certainly not effective policemen.
 
The Congress of the United States has been bought and paid for by special interest groups: part of it is Wall Street, part of it is the banks and part of it is Israel. We’re just trying to do things that we can’t do. What the US needs to do is mind its own business.
 
TGR: You’ve commented recently that you’re expecting a stock market crash soon. Can you elaborate on that?
 
Bob Moriarty: We have two giant elephants in the room fighting it out. One is the inflation elephant and one is the deflation elephant. The deflation elephant is the $710 trillion worth of derivatives, which is $100,000 per man, woman and child on earth. Those derivatives have to blow up and crash. That’s going to be deflationary.
 
At the same time, we’ve got the world awash in debt, more debt than we’ve ever had in history, and it’s been inflationary in terms of energy and the stock market. When the stock and bond markets implode, as we know they’re going to, we’re going to see some really scary things. We’ll go to quantitative easing infinity, and we’re going to see the price of gold go through the roof. It’s going to go to the moon when everything else crashes.
 
TGR: How are you looking at the crash – short term, before the end of this year? How imminent are we?
 
Bob Moriarty: Soon. But I’m in the market. Not in the general market, but I’m in resources. There’s a triangle of value created by a guy named John Exter: Exter’s Pyramid. It’s an inverted pyramid. At the top there are derivatives, and then there are miscellaneous assets going down: securitized debt and stocks, broad currency and physical notes. At the very bottom – the single most valuable asset at the end of time – is gold. When the derivatives, bonds, currencies and stock markets crash, the last man standing is going to be gold.
 
TGR: So the last man standing is the actual commodity, not the stocks?
 
Bob Moriarty: Not necessarily. The stocks represent fractional ownership of a real commodity. There are some really wonderful companies out there with wonderful assets that are selling for peanuts.
 
TGR: In one of your recent articles, “Black Swans and Brown Snakes“, you were tracking the US Dollar Index as it climbed 12 weeks in a row, and you discussed the influence of the Yen, the Euro, the British Pound. Can you explain the US Dollar Index and the impact it has on silver and gold?
 
Bob Moriarty: First of all, when people talk about the US Dollar Index, they think it has something to do with the Dollar and it does not. It is made up of the Euro, the Yen, the Mexican Peso, the British Pound and some other currencies. When the Euro goes down, the Dollar Index goes up. When the Yen goes down, the Dollar Index goes up. The Dollar, as measured by the Dollar Index, got way too expensive. It was up 12 weeks in a row. On Oct. 3, it was up 1.33% in one day, and that’s a blow-off top. It’s very obvious in hindsight. I took a look at the charts for silver and gold – if you took a mirror to the Dollar Index, you saw the charts for silver and gold inversely. When people talk about gold going down and silver going down, that’s not true. The Euro went down. The Yen went down. The Pound went down and the value of gold and silver didn’t change. It only changed in reference to the US Dollar. In every currency except the Dollar, gold and silver haven’t changed in value at all since July.
 
The US Dollar Index got irrationally exuberant, and it’s due for a crash. When it crashes, it’s going to take the stock market with it and perhaps the bond market. If you see QE increase, head for your bunker.
 
TGR: Should I conclude that gold and silver will escalate?
 
Bob Moriarty: Yes. There was an enormous flow of money from China, Japan, England, Europe in general into the stock and bond markets. What happened from July was the equivalent of the water flowing out before a tsunami hits. It’s not the water coming in that signals a tsunami, it’s the water going out. Nobody paid attention because everybody was looking at it in terms of silver or gold or platinum or oil, and they were not looking at the big picture. You’ve got to look at the big picture. A financial crash is coming. I’m not going to beat around the bush. I’m not saying there’s a 99% chance. There’s a 100% chance.
 
TGR: Why does it have to crash? Why can’t it just correct?
 
Bob Moriarty: Because the world’s financial system is in such disequilibrium that it can’t gradually go down. It has to crash. The term for it in physics is called entropy. When you spin a top, at first it is very smooth and regular. As it slows down, it becomes more and more unstable and eventually it simply crashes. The financial system is doing the same thing. It’s becoming more and more unstable every day.
 
TGR: You spoke at the Cambridge House International 2014 Silver Summit Oct. 23-24. Bo Polny also spoke. He predicts that gold will be the greatest trade in history. He’s calling for $2000 per ounce gold before the end of this year. We’re moving into the third seven-year cycle of a 21-year bull cycle. Do you agree with him?
 
Bob Moriarty: I’ve seen several interviews with Bo. The only problem with his cycles theory is you can’t logically or factually see his argument. Now if you look at my comments about silver, gold and the stock market, factually we know the US Dollar Index went up 12 weeks in a row. That’s not an opinion; that’s a fact. I’m using both facts and logic to make a point.
 
When a person walks in and says, okay, my tea leaves say that gold is going to be $2000 by the end of the year, you are forced to either believe or disbelieve him based on voodoo. I don’t predict price; I don’t know anybody who can. If Bo actually can, he’s going to be very popular and very rich.
 
TGR: Many people have predicted a significant crash for a number of years. How do you even begin to time this thing? A lot of people who have been speculating on this have lost money.
 
Bob Moriarty: That’s a really good point. People have been betting against the Yen for years. That’s been one of the most expensive things you can bet against. Likewise, people have been betting on gold and silver and they’ve lost a lot of money. I haven’t made the money that I wish I’d made over the last three years, but I’ve taken a fairly conservative approach and I don’t think I’m in bad shape.
 
TGR: Describe your conservative approach.
 
Bob Moriarty: The way to make money in any market is to buy when things are cheap and sell when they’re dear. It’s as simple as that. Markets go up and markets go down. There is no magic to anything.
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Oct 31

King Dollar in a Bull Market

Gold Price Comments Off on King Dollar in a Bull Market
But change your goggles and hey! Commodities in AUD not too bad…!
 

BORING as it sounds, I want to talk a bit about the end of US QE today, writes Greg Canavan in The Daily Reckoning Australia.
 
Because it’s very important to how markets are going to behave over the next few months.
 
As you probably know, yesterday the US Federal Reserve voted to end its policy of quantitative easing. But it will still be reinvesting the interest payments from its $4 trillion plus portfolio and rolling over any maturing treasury securities, so it’s balance sheet will continue to grow, albeit much more slowly.
 
On the surface, US markets didn’t seem too fussed about the end of an era. Shares sold off around the time of the Fed’s statement and then rallied towards the close. Probably a case of “algo’s going wild” as automated high frequency traders tried to make sense of the Fed’s statement.
 
And the Fed did its usual job of promising to hold rates as low as they possibly could, which markets seemed happy enough with.
 
But the real action took place under the surface. That is, the US Dollar spiked higher again. This is an important point because when the US Dollar rallies, it usually signifies tightening global liquidity.
 
Think of it as liquidity returning to the source (US capital markets) and drying up…or disappearing. That’s certainly what has been happening these past few months. Since bottoming in May, the US Dollar index (which measures the greenback’s performance against a basket of currencies) has increased by nearly 9%.
 
That might not sound like a huge spike, but in the world of currency movements, it is. Imagine if you’re an exporter and your product just became 9% more expensive…chances are it will lead to a drop in sales as customers look for a cheaper substitute.
 
This is the problem with the end of QE. It leads to liquidity evaporation as ‘punt money’ returns home…which leads to a strengthening US Dollar…which hurts sales of US multinationals.
 
It’s not going to happen right away though. Most companies have hedging strategies in place that protect them from sharp moves in the FX markets. But if Dollar strength persists…and the chart above says that it will, then you’ll see the strong Dollar hitting companies’ revenue line in the coming quarterly reports.
 
Not only that, but the evaporation of liquidity in general could lead to another bout of selling across global markets. QE is all about providing confidence. Liquidity is synonymous with confidence. Take it away and you’ll see the mood of the market change.
 
Getting back to the Dollar strength…it’s a headache for Australia too. It’s smashing the iron ore price, and the Aussie Dollar isn’t falling fast enough to keep up. In terms of the other commodities though, things aren’t quite so bad.
 
All you seem to hear lately is negative news about commodities. That’s because the world prices commodities in US Dollars, and as you’ve seen, the US Dollar is a picture of strength. But if you look at commodity prices in terms of Aussie Dollars, things look a little better.
 
The chart below shows the CRB commodity index, denominated in Australian Dollars. It’s a weekly chart over the past five years. And y’know what…it doesn’t look that bad! Since bottoming in 2012, it’s made considerable progress in heading back to the 2011 highs.
 
But you’ll want to see it start to bottom around these levels. If it doesn’t, prices could head much lower.
 
 
The thing to note about this chart is that it doesn’t include the bulk commodities – iron ore and coal. These commodities tend to dominate the headlines in Australia. Things like nickel, tin, copper and oil don’t get much of a look in.
 
Which reminds me, in case you missed it, Diggers and Drillers analyst Jason Stevenson recently released a report on some small Aussie oil ‘wildcatters’. With the oil price low, now could be a good time to sniff around the sector.
 
You could say that about commodities across the board. In the space of a few years, they’ve gone from hero to zero…or the penthouse to the…
 
That usually means there could be some good value around. One thing you need to look for in the current environment is a decent demand/supply dynamic. Iron ore in particular is heading towards massive oversupply next year. I reckon that makes it a poor investment choice for the next few years.
 
You’re better off to wait until the China slowdown and supply surge knocks out the juniors and all the marginal producers….leaving the market to BHP and Rio. You’ll then probably be able to pick these mining giants up at much lower levels.
 
Once you find a commodity with good supply/demand fundamentals, you need to make sure the producer is low cost. That protects it against further price falls…or a rise in the Australian Dollar.
 
It also protects it against foreign competition. One of the issues with the Aussie resources sector in recent years is costs. Other countries have much cheaper capital and labour costs and can therefore get stuff out of the ground cheaper than us.
 
That brings me to a final issue: Australia doesn’t really invest in its own resource sector. Via superannuation, we have a huge pool of capital. But this mostly goes into the banks or the major miners. Superannuation capital is not high risk capital.
 
That means a lot of the capital that flows into the resource sector is foreign. And when global financial conditions change…like the end of QE and the strengthening of the US Dollar…that capital departs.
 
This will create problems and opportunities for the sector. But given the bearishness towards commodities in general, it’s probably time to start getting interested again.
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Oct 30

Peak Oil? How About Peak Oil Storage?

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Here’s how cheap US energy promises an ‘epic’ turnaround in the US economy…
 

MATT BADIALI is editor of the S&A Resource Report, a monthly investment advisory focusing on natural resources from Stansberry & Associates.
 
A regular contributor to Growth Stock Wire, Badiali has experience as a hydrologist, geologist and consultant to the oil industry, and holds a master’s degree in geology from Florida Atlantic University.
 
Here he tells The Gold Report‘s sister title The Mining Report that cheap oil prices and the economic prosperity they bring can make politicians and investors look smarter than they are. Hence Badiali’s forecast that Hillary Clinton…if elected in 2016…could go become one of America’s most popular presidents. Yes, really.
 
The Mining Report: You have said that Hillary Clinton could go down in history as one of the best presidents ever. Why?
 
Matt Badiali: Before we get your readership in an uproar, let me clarify that the oddsmakers say that Hillary Clinton is probably going to take the White House in the next election. Even Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffet said she is a slam dunk. I’m not personally a huge fan of Hillary Clinton, but I believe whoever the next president is will ride a wave of economic benefits that will cast a rosy glow on the administration.
 
Her husband benefitted from the same lucky timing. In the 1980s, people had money and felt secure. It wasn’t because of anything Bill Clinton did. He just happened to step onto the train as the economy started humming. Hillary is going to do the same thing. In this case, an abundance of affordable energy will fuel that glow. The fact is things are about to get really good in the United States.
 
TMR: Are you saying shale oil and gas production can overcome all the other problems in the country?
 
Matt Badiali: Cheap natural gas is already impacting the economy. In 2008, we were paying $14 per thousand cubic feet. Then, in March 2012, the price bottomed below $2 because we had found so much of it. We quit drilling the shale that only produces dry gas because it wasn’t economic. You can’t really export natural gas without spending billions to reverse the natural gas importing infrastructure that was put in place before the resource became a domestic boom. The result is that natural gas is so cheap that European and Asian manufacturing companies are moving here. Cheap energy trumps cheap labor any day.
 
The same thing is happening in tight crude oil. We are producing more oil today than we have in decades. We are filling up every tank, reservoir and teacup because we need more pipelines. And it is just getting started. Companies are ramping up production and hiring lots of people. By 2016, the US will have manufacturing, jobs and a healthy export trade. It will be an economic resurgence of epic proportions.
 
TMR: The economist and The Prize author Daniel Yergin forecasted US oil production of 14 million barrels a day by 2035. What are the implications for that both in terms of infrastructure and price?
 
Matt Badiali: Let’s start with the infrastructure. The US produces over 8.5 million barrels a day right now; a jump to 14 would be a 65% increase. That would require an additional 5.5 million barrels a day.
 
To put this in perspective, the growth of oil production from 2005 to today is faster than at any other time in American history, including the oil boom of the 1920s and 1930s. And we’re adding it in bizarre places like North Dakota, places that have never produced large volumes of oil in the past.
 
North Dakota now produces over 1.1 million barrels a day, but doesn’t have the pipeline capacity to move the oil to the refineries and the people who use it. There also aren’t enough places to store it. The bottlenecks are knocking as much as $10 per barrel off the price to producers and resulting in lots of oil tankers on trains.
 
And it isn’t just happening in North Dakota. Oil and gas production in Colorado, Ohio, Pennsylvania and even parts of Texas is overwhelming our existing infrastructure. That is why major pipeline and transportation companies have exploded in value. They already have some infrastructure in place and they have the ability to invest in new pipelines.
 
The problem we are facing in refining is that a few decades ago we thought we were running out of the good stuff, the light sweet crude oil. So refiners invested $100 billion to retool for the heavier, sour crudes from Canada, Venezuela and Mexico. That leaves little capacity for the new sources of high-quality oil being discovered in our backyard. That limited capacity results in lower prices for what should be premium grades.
 
One solution would be to lift the restriction on crude oil exports that dates back to the 1970s, when we were feeling protectionist. It is illegal for us to export crude oil. And because all the new oil is light sweet crude, the refiners can only use so much. That means the crude oil is piling up.
 
Peak oil is no longer a problem, but peak storage is. If we could ship the excess overseas, producers would get a fair price for the quality of their products. That would lead them to invest in more discovery. However, if they continue to get less money for their products, investment will slow. 
 
TMR: Is everything on sale, as Rick Rule likes to say?
 
Matt Badiali: Everything is on sale. But the great thing about oil is it is not like metals. It is cyclical, but it’s critical. If you want your boats to cross oceans, your airplanes to fly, your cars to drive and your military to move, you have to have oil. You don’t have to buy a new ship today, which would take metals. But if you want that sucker to go from point A to point B, you have to have oil. That’s really important. There have been five cycles in oil prices in the last few years.
 
Oil prices rise and then fall. That’s what we call a cycle. Each cycle impacts both the oil price and the stock prices of oil companies. These cycles are like clockwork. Their periods vary, but it’s been an annual event since 2009. Shale, especially if we can export it, could change all of that.
 
The rest of the world’s economy stinks. Russia and Europe are flirting with recession. China is a black box, but it is not as robust as we thought it was. Extra supply in the US combined with less demand than expected is leading to temporary low oil prices. But strategically and economically, oil is too important for the price to get too low for too long.
 
I was recently at a conference in Washington DC where International Energy Agency Executive Director Maria van der Hoeven predicted that without significant investment in the oil fields in the Middle East, we can expect a $15 per barrel increase in the price of oil globally by 2025.
 
I don’t foresee a lot of people investing in those places right now. A shooting war is not the best place to be invested. I was in Iraq last year and met the Kurds, and they’re wonderful people. This is just a nightmare for them. And for the rest of the world it means a $15 increase in oil.
 
For investors, the prospect of oil back at $100 per barrel is not the end of the world. With oil prices down 20% from recent highs and the best companies down over 30% in value, it is a buying opportunity. It means the entire oil sector has just gone on sale, including the companies building the infrastructure.
 
As oil prices climb back to $100, companies will continue to invest in producing more oil. And that will turn Hillary Clinton’s eight-year presidency into an economic wonderland.
 
TMR: The last time you and I chatted, you explained that different shales have different geology with different implications for cracking it, drilling it and transporting it. Are there parts of the country where it’s cheaper to produce and companies will get higher prices?
 
Matt Badiali: The producers in the Bakken are paying about twice as much to ship their oil by rail as the ones in the Permian or in Texas are paying to put it in a pipeline. The Eagle Ford is still my favorite quality shale and it is close to existing pipelines and export infrastructure, if that becomes a viable option. There are farmers being transformed into millionaires in Ohio as we speak, thanks to the Utica Shale.
 
TMR: What about the sands providers? Is that another way to play the service companies?
 
Matt Badiali: Absolutely. The single most important factor in cracking the shale code is sand. If the pages of a book are the thin layers of rocks in the shale, pumping water is how the producers pop the rock layers apart and sand is the placeholder that props them open despite the enormous pressure from above. Today, for every vertical hole, drillers create long horizontals and divide them into 30+ sections with as much as 1,500 pounds of sand per section. A single pad in the Eagle Ford could anchor four vertical holes with four horizontal legs requiring the equivalent of 200 train car loads of sand.
 
Investors need to distinguish between companies that provide highly refined sand for oil services and companies that bag sand for school playgrounds. Fracking sand is filtered and graded for consistency to ensure the most oil is recovered. Investors have to be careful about the type of company they are buying.
 
TMR: Coal still fuels a big chunk of the electricity in the US Can a commodity be politically incorrect and a good investment?
 
Matt Badiali: Coal has a serious headwind, and it’s not just that it’s politically incorrect. It competes with natural gas as an electrical fuel so you would expect the two commodities would trade for roughly the same price for the amount of electricity they can generate, but they don’t. The Environmental Protection Agency is enacting emission standards that are effectively closing down coal-fired power plants. And because it is baseload power, you can’t easily shut it off and turn it back on; it has to be maintained. That means it doesn’t augment variable power like solar, as well as natural gas, which can be turned on and off like a jet engine turbine. So coal has two strikes against it. It is dirty and it isn’t flexible.
 
Some coal companies could survive this transition, however. Metallurgical coal (met coal) companies, which produce a clean coal for making steel, have better prospects than steam coal. Along with steam coal, met coal prices are at a six-year low. 
 
Generally, I want to own coal that can be exported to India or China, where they really need it. Japan has replaced a lot of its nuclear power with coal and Germany restarted all the coal-fired power plants it had closed because of carbon emissions goals. We are already seeing deindustrialization there due to high energy prices. Cheap energy sources, including coal, will be embraced. I just don’t know when.
 
TMR: Thank you for your time, Matt.
 
Matt Badiali: Thank you.
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Oct 29

Don’t Get Bullish on Gold Below $1350

Gold Price Comments Off on Don’t Get Bullish on Gold Below $1350
This month’s “triple bottom” is not, repeat NOT, confirmed says this technical analyst…
 

WAYNE KAUFMAN is chief market analyst at Phoenix Financial in New York.
 
Regularly quoted in the media and interviewed on Fox, CNBC and the BBC, Kaufman produces a daily report for Phoenix, is a member of the Market Technicians Association, and has taught level 3 of the MTA’s three-level online course for Chartered Market Technician candidates.
 
Here Kaufman speaks to Mike Norman on behalf of Hard Assets Investor about how he sees the big picture right now…
 
Hard Assets Investor: We’ve seen some crazy gyrations in gold, in the Dollar, in oil, even in stocks. Summarize how it looks to you.
 
Wayne Kaufman: In terms of US equities, we’ve been watching a deterioration of underlying market breadth, that hasn’t shown up, or had not shown up in the major indexes until the last couple of weeks. But for the last three or four months, we’ve been watching small-caps get decimated. And then the midcaps followed. And then the large-caps, S&P 500, had a peak recently. But the breadth was terrible.
 
And now the stocks have rolled over. It’s to the point where you’ve only got about 18% of S&P 1500 stocks over their own 50-day moving average, less than one in five. About one in three are still over their 200-day moving average. So that underlying deterioration came through and pulled down the majors.
 
HAI: Now with small stocks weak like that, wouldn’t that suggest general economic weakness, or at least a tipoff to that effect, that we’re seeing basically small, medium-sized businesses not doing very well?
 
Kaufman: Definitely. You’re right. You’re talking about changes taking place. The question in the mind of investors right now is, we’re seeing the weakness in China, in Europe, in Germany suddenly rolling over. You’ve got the price of oil. It’s all of these things that are turning dramatically. Is this a long-term trend change? Or is this just going to be short term? Is it just typical October stuff, in the case of equities? That’s what we’re going to find out over the next few weeks.
 
HAI: But is there really a downside, when people know the central banks are going to be there, push comes to shove?
 
Kaufman: There, at a point, is only going to be so much that the central banks can do. I was recently asked by a news outlet to give my projections for the S&P, and my reasoning. My No. 1 reason for being bullish is central banks around the world will do everything possible to prevent a global recession. Are they really able to do much more? We know they’ll try. Are they going to wait too long before they do? How effective can they be?
 
HAI: Last time you were here, you were negative on gold. And that play worked out pretty well. How do you see things panning out from this point?
 
Kaufman: I see short-term, over-sold and over-bearish sentiment. So a bounce is definitely in the cards, especially if there’s some short covering by people who are short the futures. But when I was here last time, I said I couldn’t get bullish unless gold broke $1400 or so. Now that number is a little lower.
 
HAI: Where is it?
 
Kaufman: $1300. I need to see $1350 at least, because you do have a potential triple bottom. A lot of people say, “Oh, triple bottom.” It’s a potential triple bottom that doesn’t get confirmed until you break unimportant resistance. Unless we can get above $1350, I’m not going to start thinking about getting bullish, except for oversold, over-bearish bounces.
 
HAI: We had a guest recently talking about the death of gold. Reminds me of the death of equities back on the infamous 1979 Business Weekcover. What do you make of that?
 
Kaufman: I agree. That’s why I’m saying I could see a bounce here, because it’s oversold, and it’s over-pessimistic. Levels of pessimism are extreme. And when you see that, that’s a good time to take the other side of that trade. The question is, how much staying power? You’re talking about commodities going down. The Dollar has been strong, which is a little too much bullishness in the Dollar. That certainly can be capped here.
 
But oil is just amazing. For years, you always said that the Saudis controlled the price of oil. You were 100% right. Because they’re the only country that really has significant excess capacity. Right now, are the Saudis purposely trying to drive the price of oil down, so that they can try and put a cap on fracking and energy exploration and production here in the States?
 
HAI: The shale guys, the shale producers.
 
Kaufman: Potentially an amazing tactical war going on between the Saudis and the US, in terms of oil production.
 
HAI: I saw an example of that back in the ’80s, when I was an oil trader on the floor of this very exchange, when they crashed the price down. That was a message sent to the non-Opec producers, the North Sea guys in particular. So I think you’re absolutely right. 
 
You mentioned the Dollar. That was a surprise to most people, because we had this narrative, for a long time, about money printing, and central banks, and quantitative easing, and hyperinflation and the Fed doing all this. Yet, look at the Dollar.
 
Kaufman: I don’t want to seem like I’m complimenting you because you’re the host, but you said this a long time ago.
 
HAI: Don’t hold back…
 
Kaufman: You said a long time ago, all the inflation guys, that they were wrong, they were going to be wrong. You were 100% right. So it was a big surprise. Now, as a technician, I called the Dollar going up at a point when I saw it giving me buy signals. I don’t do it the intuitive or the economist way. It’s extremely overbought. And it’s extremely over-bullish. It has been taking a pause. I think it’ll continue to pause here. It’s just too many people on that side of the trade at this point.
 
HAI: We heard comments recently from New York Fed President William Dudley, to the effect that a Dollar that’s too strong might hinder our ability to achieve our goals. Hint, hint, a little bit of code words there…
 
Kaufman: You’re right. But the problem they have is that the strong Dollar is going to hurt exports, obviously. But you’ve got S&P 500 companies due in the neighborhood of 40% of revenues, 50% of profits overseas. So, whether it’s from the strong Dollar or just because the economies overseas are very weak right now, no matter how you go on that, it’s going to be a problem. And the world economy needs to clear up. We’re not an island unto ourselves; it will affect us. And I think that’s what equities are starting to show.
 
HAI: Good points. Wayne, always great to have you here. Thanks very much.
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Oct 23

US Oil & Global Gold

Gold Price Comments Off on US Oil & Global Gold
US oil stocks have soared as shale pushes crude prices down. But gold…?
 

The UNITED STATES is doing better than it has in years, writes Frank Holmes on his Frank Talk blog at US Global Investors.
 
Jobs growth is up, unemployment is down, our manufacturing sector carries the rest of the world on its shoulders like a wounded soldier and the World Economic Forum named the US the third-most competitive nation, our highest ranking since before the recession.
 
As heretical as it sounds, there’s a downside to America’s success, and that’s a stronger Dollar. Although our currency has softened recently, it has put pressure on two commodities that we consider our lifeblood at US Global Investors: gold and oil.
 
It’s worth noting that we’ve been here before. In October 2011, a similar correction occurred in energy, commodities and resources stocks based on European and Chinese growth fears. 
 
But international economic stimulus measures helped raise market confidence, and many of the companies we now own within these sectors benefited. Between October 2011 and January 2012, Anadarko Petroleum rose 58%; Canadian Natural Resources, 20%; Devon Energy, 15%; Cimarex Energy, 15%; Peyto Exploration & Development, 15%; and Suncor Energy, 10%.
 
Granted, we face new challenges this year that have caused market jitters – Ebola and ISIS, just to name a couple. But we’re confident that once the Dollar begins to revert back to the mean, a rally in energy and resources stocks might soon follow. Brian Hicks, portfolio manager of our Global Resources Fund (PSPFX), notes that he’s been nibbling on cheap stocks ahead of a potential rally, one that, he hopes, mimics what we saw in late 2011 and early 2012.
 
A repeat of last year’s abnormally frigid winter, though unpleasant, might help heat up some of the sectors and companies that have underperformed lately.
 
On the left side of the chart below, you can see 45 years’ worth of data that show fairly subdued fluctuations in gold prices in relation to the Dollar. On the right side, by contrast, you can see that the strong Dollar pushed bullion prices down 6% in September, historically gold’s strongest month. This move is unusual also because gold has had a monthly standard deviation of ±5.5% based on the last 10 years’ worth of data.
 
 
Here’s another way of looking at it. On October 3, bullion fell below $1200 to prices we haven’t seen since 2010, but they quickly rebounded to the $1240 range as the Dollar index receded from its peak the same day.
 
 
There’s no need to worry just yet. This isn’t 2013, when the metal gave back 28%. And despite the correction, would it surprise you to learn that gold has actually outperformed several of the major stock indices this year?
 
 
As for gold stocks, there’s no denying the facts: With few exceptions, they’ve been taken to the woodshed. September was demonstrably cruel. Based on the last five years’ worth of data, the NYSE Arca Gold BUGS Index has had a monthly standard deviation of ±9.4, but last month it plunged 20%. We haven’t seen such a one-month dip since April 2013. This volatility exemplifies why we always advocate for no more than a 10% combined allocation to gold and gold stocks in investor portfolios.
 
Oil’s slump is a little more complicated to explain.
 
Since the end of World War II, black gold has been priced in US greenbacks. This means that when our currency fluctuates as dramatically as it has recently, it affects every other nation’s consumption of crude. Oil, then, has become much more expensive lately for the slowing European and Asian markets. Weaker purchasing power equals less overseas oil demand equals even lower prices.
 
What some people are calling the American energy renaissance has also led to lower oil prices. Spurred by more efficient extraction techniques such as fracking, the US has been producing over 8.5 million barrels a day, the highest domestic production level since 1986. 
 
We’re awash in the stuff, with supply outpacing demand. Whereas the rest of the world has flat-lined in terms of oil production, the US has zoomed to 30-year highs.
In a way, American shale oil has become a victim of its own success.
 
 
At the end of next month, members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) are scheduled to meet in Vienna. As Brian speculated during our most recent webcast, it would be surprising if we didn’t see another production cut. With Brent oil for November delivery at $83 a barrel – a four-year low – many oil-rich countries, including Iran, Iraq and Venezuela and Saudi Arabia, will have a hard time balancing their books. Venezuela, in fact, has been clamoring for an emergency meeting ahead of November to make a plea for production cuts. 
 
 
Although not an OPEC member, Russia, once the world’s largest producer of crude, is being squeezed by plunging oil prices on the left, international sanctions on the right. This might prompt President Vladimir Putin to scale back the country’s presence in Ukraine and delay a multibillion-Dollar revamp of its armed forces. When the upgrade was approved in 2011, GDP growth was expected to hold at 6%. But now as a result of the sanctions and dropping oil prices, Russia faces a dismally flat 0.5%.
 
The current all-in sustaining cost to produce one ounce of gold is hovering between $1000 and $1200. With the price of bullion where it is, many miners can barely break even. Production has been down 10% because it’s become costlier to excavate. As I recently told Kitco News’ Daniela Cambone, we will probably start seeing supply shrinkage in North and South America and Africa.
 
The same could happen to oil production. Extraction of shale oil here in the US costs companies between $50 and $100 a barrel, with producers able to break even at around $80 to $85. If prices slide even further, drillers might be forced to trim their capital budgets or even shelve new projects.
 
Michael Levi of the Council on Foreign Relations told NPR’s Audie Cornish that a decrease in drilling could hurt certain commodities:
“[I]f prices fall far enough for long enough, you’ll see a pullback in drilling. And shale drilling uses a lot of manufactured goods – 20% of what people spend on a well is steel, 10% is cement, so less drilling means less manufacturing in those sectors.”
At the same time, Levi places oil prices in a long-term context, reminding listeners that we’ve become accustomed to unusually high prices for the last three years.
“People were starting to believe that this was permanent, and they were wrong,” he said. “So the big news is that volatility is back.”
On this note, be sure to visit our interactive and perennially popular Periodic Table of Commodities, which you can modify to view gold and oil’s performance going back ten years.
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Oct 19

I See Two Horsemen

Gold Price Comments Off on I See Two Horsemen
Patience needed, but the Dollar has been rising with the Gold/Silver Ratio…
 

The BLACK LINE is where we have been, writes Gary Tanashian in his Notes from the Rabbit Hole. The blue line is a projection of what a typical correction (whether a healthy interim one or a bear market kick off) might look like.
 
 
We used real charts of the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 to gauge the entry into the current correction and now the resistance points to the expected bounce off of the US market’s first healthy sentiment reset in quite some time. But our cartoon above gives you the favored plan on how the correction could play out.
 
Last week, the market bounced on what can only be viewed as a sad attempt by a Fed member (a perceived Hawk, no less) to jawbone a stop to the impulsive bearishness. The strength of the US Dollar and first decent correction since 2011 seems to have spooked the folks over at Policy Central and suddenly they are talking QE again. That does not inspire confidence, if you are a bull.
 
Be that as it may, we have been due for a bounce to clean out the over bearish and over sold conditions. We are making no claims to know whether or not this is a bear market kick-off because when the process is complete per the sketch above, a trade-worthy rally should materialize when a notable low is ground out.
 
An impulsive straight line drop, to support though it is in many cases (ref. the real charts of the Semiconductors and the Banks), and recovery on policy makers’ jawboning is not usually a path to sustained recovery.
 
NFTRH is managing a bounce (the first ‘up’ phase of the blue line above) until/unless it proves it is more than that. Traders should be nimble. If the projection proves out, a renewed decline into November could follow, which should come out of a good setup for bearishly inclined traders.
 
Moving on, volatility is back and while it seemed to come out of nowhere, it was easily readable in advance by steadily declining junk vs. quality bond yields spreads, declining index and sector participation rates and of course, the strong US Dollar (which is decidedly not on the favored agenda of asset-friendly policy makers), among several other indicators we tracked into and through the first part of the correction.
 
Per the scenario above, in the likely event a bottom has not yet been registered, one will eventually be ground out and it should be good for a trade at least. Personally, I have positioned for a bounce right here but that is not recommended for anyone who is not willing to trade on a dime, in-day and in-week. The answer to the question ‘cyclical bull ender or not?’ does not need to come yet, but there is going to be data galore going forward. We’ll work the data as it comes in. Meanwhile, an intermediate bear trend is in force.
 
We had gauged the outperformance of the Emerging Markets (EEM vs. SPY) for much of this year, but when the ratio broke down we noted it in real time. So we shorted the EM’s and prepared for coming bearishness in US markets. We have been charting Europe’s decline for months now, initially shorting Spain, which had previously been our guide to the upside speculative impulse that took hold in Europe.
 
Global markets are nearly but not yet broken with Europe and the World index at key big picture support, the Emerging Markets having made a false breakout and failure, China actually looking interesting here, Japan playing the ‘push me, pull you’ game with its currency and Canada doing some bearish things as the TSX not only loses its blue sky breakout, but starts snapping support levels. The TSX-V (CDNX) is leading the way down and is flat out destroyed right along with any speculative spirits in the world of scammy little Canadian ‘resource’ plays.
 
Early in 2014 we charted the CCI index of commodities, and its hold of critical support at 500 as well as its resistance to the breakout and rally that followed. More recently we managed the decline to and through that support level while maintaining a “not interested” stance the whole way. Commodities can bounce with any ‘inflation trade’ bounce (watch TIP-TLT and other inflation expectations indicators) that may manifest.
 
We were not interested in commodities because we were given no reason to have a favorable view of inflation expectations, which through the TIP-TLT ratio were gauged to be burrowing through the floor week after week. This was also another negative for the US stock market, which had been feasting like Goldilocks on the bears’ porridge.
 
Foremost among the indicators have been Yield Curves generally favoring US stocks and hurting gold, until the curve burst upward beginning last week. This has not surprisingly come with the US stock market correction. If the market bounces, the curve can decline and junk-quality bond spreads can bounce. Also, the VIX needs a rest.
 
The big daddy of indicators however, has been the Two Horsemen, i.e. the Gold-Silver ratio and the US Dollar rising together. This was an indicator of failing liquidity which NFTRH and indeed our public website, noted in real time.
 
It is the indicators even more so than straight up technical analysis that will help us decide whether or not the bull market has ended as we move forward through coming data points.
 
Deflationary and economic growth troubles across the globe are blamed for the recent strength in the US Dollar and to a degree that holds merit. The other support has been the very real economic recovery in the US (beginning with the Semiconductor sector) born of very unreal (i.e. unnatural and unsustainable) policy inputs.
 
Naturally, it stands to reason that if Dollar compromising policy is promoted to keep assets aloft, then a strong Dollar is unwelcome. Because not only would it begin to eat away at exporting sectors like manufacturing, but it would also make assets less expensive. But that should be a good thing, no? Declining prices in things like oil, food and services? Not on the one-way street that is our current system of Inflation onDemand.
 
The Yen is strong lately and the Euro can gain a bounce bid. This means that the USD can continue to weaken from its impulsively over bought and over loved levels. But on the big picture USD has been moving upward from a long-term basing pattern.
 
Gold is meantime favored over silver, given the move in the Gold/Silver Ratio and diminishing global liquidity. Beyond that, gold’s fundamentals have not been constructive for some time now, no matter how often idealists click the heels of their ruby slippers.
 
That was then, this is now. Gold is counter cyclical per the Gold-Commodities chart in this post. This one chart is the very reason that NFTRH never did take its focus off the biggest picture view of an ongoing global economic contraction in progress. This would be the gateway to a real bull market in gold mining stocks, but it is also the more difficult pathway because the inflationists get weeded out along the way as silver does not go to the moon and lazy analysis gets punished, not rewarded.
 
Gold stocks are counter cyclical and macro indicators, and they say we may be at the start of grinding out a counter cyclical phase. But note the word grind. That’s what it has been and what it could continue to be for a while yet. As gold slowly asserts itself vs. cyclical commodities, cost-input fundamentals gradually improve in the industry and as gold slowly asserts itself vs. stock markets an important component of investor psychology slowly comes into place.
 
Patience…the macro does not pivot over night.
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Oct 16

Marc Faber: Get Gold, Get Ready for QE99

Gold Price Comments Off on Marc Faber: Get Gold, Get Ready for QE99
Tapering QE to zero, if it happens this month, will be temporary reckons Marc Faber…
 

SWISS-BORN and -educated Marc Faber’s distinct voice is a common sound on CNBC and Bloomberg TV when it comes to big-picture forecasting in investments, says Sumit Roy at Hard Assets Investor.
 
Publisher of the Gloom, Boom & Doom Report, Faber’s views on the markets are highly regarded. Here I spoke to him about the recent moves in stocks, the Dollar and gold.
 
HardAssetsInvestor: What’s your view on the stock market? Is the recent volatility a sign of a top or will stocks hit new records by the end of the year?
 
Marc Faber: The likelihood that we have something more serious now is quite high. There has been considerable technical damage in the market, with approximately half of Nasdaq and Russell 2000 shares already down 20% or more from their highs. Combine that with the fact that Treasury bond yields have again declined meaningfully, and it suggests the economy is not on a very sound footing.
 
We are in a period of elevated prices. From real estate to equities to bonds, there is a lot of excess. Going forward, the return on these assets will be very disappointing.
 
HAI: The strength in the bond market has surprised a lot of people. We’re seeing record-low interest rates for German and other European bonds. And even in the US, the 10-year yield is now hitting a new low for the year. Why are investors buying these bonds?
 
Marc Faber: The bond market is manipulated by central bank buying of government debt. Yields are lower than they would otherwise be if the Fed and other central banks didn’t buy them. Secondly, the decline in yields may be a sign that bonds buyers don’t believe in the global recovery story when it comes to the economy. In fact, the low yields on bonds would suggest that we may be entering a period of deflation.
 
HAI: The US Dollar has been rising and hit a four-year high earlier this month. Is the Dollar going to continue to rally from here?
 
Marc Faber: The trade and current account deficit of the US has been coming down because the balance in the energy trade has improved a lot. The US is almost oil self-sufficient. It’s become the largest crude oil producer in the world.
 
And even though the US economy is not doing particularly well, it’s in a slightly better position than the European economy. Thus, there are some reasons the Dollar should be stronger.
 
That said, based on sentiment figures, everybody is now bullish on the US Dollar. Usually when you have this kind of consensus, what can happen is a powerful contra-move. In other words, the Dollar could weaken for a while. That would be good for stocks and precious metals.
 
Additionally, if the Fed finds that the Dollar is too strong, it can print money. But you just don’t know what these academics will eventually decide to do. That’s why I recommend investors have a diversified portfolio, because nobody knows what the world will look like five years from now.
  
HAI: The Fed has said it’s going to end QE this month and raise interest rates sometime in 2015. Do you believe that will happen?
 
Marc Faber: It won’t raise interest rates for a long time. Certainly not in real terms. It’s possible that it’ll end QE4 and that the asset purchases come to an end. But only temporarily. When it introduced QE1, my view was that it would go to QE99. And I still maintain that view.
 
HAI: You’re saying that it’ll have to come back and do QE again sometime in the future?
 
Marc Faber: Yes. One of the reasons we have weak growth in the Western world, and in the US, and in Japan, is because of government interventions with fiscal policies. Spending – supported by money printing – has led to an ever-expanding government as a percent of the economy. And the bigger the government is, the slower economic growth will be. The extreme is when the government controls everything in the economy, such as under the socialist/communist planning system.
 
HAI: One way investors can hedge against all these risks is gold. We saw prices reach a low of $1183 last week, but it’s bounced back since then. What do you make of gold right now?
 
Marc Faber: I’ve advocated owning gold since the late 1990s. It is a safe investment in times of monetary uncertainty and monetary inflation. I would keep roughly 25% of my assets in gold.
 
HAI: Do you consider it an investment that’s going to stay stable? Or something that can increase in value from current levels?
 
Marc Faber: We had a huge bull market in gold that outperformed just about any other investment between 1999 and September 2011. We’re now three years into a correction phase. Can gold drop below $1000 first before it goes up meaningfully? It’s possible. Because as you know, there has been some manipulation in the gold market. However, gold will go higher over time.
 
HAI: Do you have any thoughts on oil’s big decline? Prices are down $20-25 per barrel since June.
 
Marc Faber: The markets have become quite volatile, largely because of money printing. This concerns not just oil, but all commodities. The price of corn, wheat, soybeans are all down around 50% from the highs. They can be down for a while, but in my view, they will not stay down.
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Oct 15

What the Bond Crash Will Look Like

Gold Price Comments Off on What the Bond Crash Will Look Like
A lot of very discontinuous action to the downside ahead…
 

“WHEN sorrows come,” wrote Shakespeare, “they come not single spies, but in battalions,” says Tim Price on his ThePriceOfEverything blog.
 
Jeremy Warner for The Daily Telegraph identifies ten of them. His “biggest threats to the global economy” comprise…
  1. Geopolitical risk;
  2. The threat of oil and gas price spikes;
  3. A hard landing in China;
  4. Normalisation of monetary policy in the Anglo-Saxon economies;
  5. Eurozone deflation;
  6. ‘Secular stagnation’;
  7. The size of the debt overhang;
  8. Complacent markets;
  9. House price bubbles;
  10. Ageing populations.
Other than making the fair observation that stock markets (for example) are not entirely correlated to economic performance – an observation for which Eurozone equity investors must surely be hugely grateful – we offer the following response.
 
Geopolitical risk, like the poor, will always be with us.
 
Yes, the prices for oil and natural gas could spike, but as things stand WTI crude futures have fallen by over 15% from their June highs, in spite of the clear geopolitical problems. And the US fracking revolution, in combination with fast-improving fundamentals for solar power, may turn out to be a secular (and disinflationary) game-changer for energy prices.
 
China, however, is tougher to dismiss. If we had any meaningful exposure to Chinese equity or debt we would be more concerned. But we don’t, so we aren’t.
 
Five of Jeremy Warner’s ‘threats’ are inextricably linked. The pending normalisation of monetary policy in the UK and US clearly threatens the integrity of the credit markets. It’s worth asking whether either central bank could possibly afford to let interest rates rise.
 
This begets a follow-on question: could the markets afford to let the central banks off the hook? Could we, in other words, finally see the return of the long absent and much desired bond market vigilantes?
 
That monetary policy rates are so low is a function of the growing prospect of Eurozone deflation (less of a threat to solvent consumers, but deadly for heavily indebted governments). Absent a capitulation by the Bundesbank to Draghi’s hopes or intentions for full-blown QE, it’s difficult to see how the policy log-jam gets resolved. But since all German government paper out to three years now offers a negative yield, it’s difficult to see why any Eurozone debt is worth buying today for risk-conscious investors. Cash is probably preferable and gives optionality into the bargain. ‘Secular stagnation’ is now a fair definition of the Eurozone’s economic prospects.
 
But all things lead back to Warner’s point 7: the size of the debt overhang. Since this was never addressed in the immediate aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis, it’s hardly a surprise to see its poison continue to drip onto all things financial. And since the policy response has been to slash rates and keep them at multi-century lows, it’s hardly a surprise to see property prices in the ascendant.
 
Complacent markets? Check. But stocks have lost a lot of their nerve over the last week. Not before time.
 
Ageing populations? Yes, but this problem has been widely discussed in the investment community over the past two decades – it simply isn’t new news.
 
We saw one particularly eye-catching chart last week, via Grant Williams, comparing the leverage ratios of major US financial institutions over recent years (shown below).
 
  
The Fed’s leverage ratio (total assets to capital) now stands at just under 80x. That compares with Lehman Brothers’ leverage ratio, just before it went bankrupt, of just under 30x. Sometimes a picture really does paint a thousand words. And this, again, brings us back to the defining problem of our time, as we see it: too much debt in the system, and simply not enough ideas about how to bring it down – other than through inflationism, and even that doesn’t seem to be working quite yet.
 
In a recent interview with Jim Grant of Grant’s Interest Rate Observer, Sprott Global questioned about the likely outlook for bonds:
“What would a bear market in bonds look like? Would it be accompanied by a bear market in the stocks?
 
“Well, we have a pretty good historical record of what a bear market in bonds would look like. We had one in modern history, from 1946 to 1981. We had 25 years’ worth of persistently – if not steadily – rising interest rates, and falling bond prices. It began with only around a quarter of a percent on long-dates US Treasuries, and ended with about 15% on long-dated US Treasuries.
 
“That’s one historical beacon. I think that the difference today might be that the movement up in yield, and down in price, might be more violent than it was during the first ten years of the bear market beginning in about 1946. Then, it took about ten years for yields to advance even 100 basis points, if I remember correctly.
 
“One difference today is the nature of the bond market. It is increasingly illiquid and it is a market in which investors – many investors – have the right to enter a sales ticket, and to expect their money within a day. So I’m not sure what a bear market would look like, but I think that it would be characterized at first by a lot of people rushing through a very narrow gate. I think problems with illiquidity would surface in the corporate debt markets.
 
“One of the unintended consequences of the financial reforms that followed the sorrows of 2007 to 2009 is that dealers who used to hold a lot of corporate debt in inventories no longer do so. If interest rates began to rise and people wanted out, I think that the corporate debt market would encounter a lot of ‘air pockets’ and a lot of very discontinuous action to the downside.”
We like that phrase “a lot of very discontinuous action to the downside”.
 
Grant was also asked if it was possible for the Fed to lose control of the bond market:
“Absolutely, it could. The Fed does not control events for the most part. Events certainly will end up controlling the Fed. To answer your question – yeah. I think the Fed can and will lose control of the bond market.”
As we have written on innumerable prior occasions, we wholeheartedly agree. Geopolitics, energy prices, demographics – all interesting ‘what if’ parlour games. But what will drive pretty much all asset markets over the near, medium and longer term is almost entirely down to how credit markets behave. The fundamentals, clearly, are utterly shocking. The implications for investors are, in our view, clear. And as a wise investor once observed, if you’re going to panic, panic early.
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Oct 03

Silver "a Screaming Buy", Crude Oil "Going to $60"

Gold Price Comments Off on Silver "a Screaming Buy", Crude Oil "Going to $60"
The beautiful thing about pessimism towards junior precious metal miners…
 

KAL KOTECHA is editor and founder of the Junior Gold Report, a publication about small-cap mining stocks.
 
Kotecha has previously held leadership positions with many junior mining companies, and after completing a Master of Business Administration in finance in 2007, he is now working on his PhD in business marketing, and also teaches economics at the University of Waterloo.
 
Here Kal Kotecha tells The Gold Report‘s sister title, The Mining Report, that to obtain superior results, you cannot do what everyone else is doing. He maintains that much of the risk associated with junior resource equities has been beaten out by the herd mentality and that selectively buying what’s left presents opportunity…
 
The Mining Report: You’re the editor of Junior Gold Report, but you also follow similar-sized companies in the energy sector. Please give our readers an overview of the energy space.
 
Kal Kotecha: I’ve been involved in the space since 2002 and I’ve never witnessed anything like what is currently happening. In the energy sector, I see the price of uranium increasing, but to see price appreciation across energy stocks, the price of oil must remain near $100 per barrel. That benchmark could prove challenging, given the growing supply of shale oil in the US Texas produces as much oil as Iraq or about 3 million barrels of oil per day. Most of it comes from two sources: the Eagle Ford Shale in southwest Texas and the Permian Basin in west Texas. Chris Guith, senior vice-president of policy for the US Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy, estimates that recoverable resources amount to 120 years of natural gas, 205 years of oil and 464 years of coal at current demand levels.
 
Fracking has lowered the price of natural gas by about 70% over the previous seven years or so. The price of oil, especially in the US, should decrease to $60-70 per barrel on average because of shale oil. US dependency on imported oil should lessen, too.
 
TMR: Is that a near- or medium-term forecast?
 
Kal Kotecha: That’s a medium- to longer-term forecast. I don’t believe in peak oil theory. The US’ savior in the oil industry is going to be shale oil, and there is a lot of it. Ultimately, that’s going enhance the US economy. Basically everything runs on oil. The US won’t have to import as much oil from Saudi Arabia or even Canada.
 
TMR: What’s your price forecast for natural gas?
 
Kal Kotecha: Natural should stay between $4-6 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf). It’s more expensive in Europe, but in North America the floor should remain around $4/Mcf. I don’t think it’s going to go back up to $12 or down to $3.
 
TMR: You mentioned earlier that you expect uranium prices to rise.
 
Kal Kotecha: Uranium is an interesting space. As oil prices slowly decrease, the demand for uranium seems to increase. Geopolitical tensions, especially in Russia and Ukraine, could lead to much higher prices. Russia is a large uranium producer and Western nations might stop importing uranium from Russia if political fires burn much hotter.
 
As of last month, China had 21 nuclear power reactors operating on 8 sites and another 20 under construction. China’s National Development and Reform Commission intends to raise the percentage of electricity produced by nuclear power to 6% by 2020 from the current 2% as part of an effort to reduce air pollution from coal-fired plants. Ultimately, uranium demand will triple inside six years.
 
In India, the government is expected to spend nearly $150 billion to develop nuclear power over the next 10-15 years. India now has nuclear energy agreements with about a dozen countries and imports primarily from France, Russia and Kazakhstan.
 
TMR: In a recent note on Junior Gold Report you wrote, “I smell smoke, but where’s the fire?” in relation to the current sentiment in the junior precious metals market. What’s your conclusion?
 
Kal Kotecha: The current pessimism surrounding the junior precious metal space has largely contributed to the fall in price of the commodities, but the beautiful thing about pessimism and hate towards a market sector is that there is plenty of room for error. Fantastic opportunities arise when great companies have been undervalued due to negative news that does not have a long-term impact on the company. So how do you determine which stocks, in a beaten up resource market, are great buys?
 
TMR: Do you have an answer?
 
Kal Kotecha: One must understand the essential principles of intrinsic value and the margin of safety. The principle of intrinsic value determines the worth of a stock through a combination of the price and the condition of the company. So no matter how great a company is, it may not always be a good investment. As Howard Marks wrote in The Most Important Thing: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor, investment success doesn’t come from buying good things, but rather from buying things well.
 
The principle of the margin of safety involves minimizing risk and then, therefore, minimizing the potential loss of one’s money. Dealing with risk is a necessary part of investing, as stock price fluctuations occur and are often unpredictable. If the risk perceived by the herd – general investors who follow the majority – is less than the actual risk, then the returns will outweigh the risks. So when consensus thinks something is risky, the general unwillingness to buy it pushes the price down to where it is no longer risky at all, given it still has intrinsic value, because all optimism has been driven out of the price.
 
TMR: What are some metrics to help investors?
 
Kal Kotecha: A junior mining company’s ability to produce resources at a cost below its market price is essential for its sustainability. Junior mining companies should be judged by their ownership of mines, the quality of these mines and how management has executed similar projects in the past. Determining whether this data has been incorporated into the stock price is essential when seeking undervalued companies. I think this is where a lot of resource investors get duped.
 
Do you smell the smoke? I suggest investigating the source. I’d say that the herd is done shouting fire, and smart investors are filling up their baskets with goodies. But don’t forget to do your research, check the facts and invest in a contrarian fashion. To obtain superior results, you cannot do what everyone else is doing.
 
TMR: Many investors have heard the adage “buy when there’s blood in the streets.” When should investors reasonably expect to start making money again, given the current market conditions?
 
Kal Kotecha: That’s a billion-Dollar question. A lot of colleagues have predicted prices that have not come true yet. The big upswing in gold in the late 1970s was followed by a collapse and we had to wait 20 years for another upswing. It’s already been three years. I don’t think we have to wait another 5 or 10 years, but there is going to be a time very soon where investors will be rewarded. I think when the upswing happens it’s going to be very parabolic. I think it’s going to take wings on its own. Patience will be rewarded.
 
TMR: What gold price are you using in your analysis?
 
Kal Kotecha: $1200 an ounce. Many factors go into determining the price of commodities, especially gold and silver. Some of these factors include price manipulation, which cannot be foreseen; geopolitical strife; and import quotas, which are happening in India. However, I remain very bullish on precious metals in the long-term.
 
The best buy right now is silver. Silver is a screaming steal at $18 per ounce. I first started buying silver at around $7 per ounce in 2003 and I sold quite a bit in the $48 range a few years ago. I’m starting to accumulate silver quite heavily again. The ratio of gold to silver prices is currently around 68:1. I see that going to 50:1. If there’s another precious metals mania, perhaps 25:1. Silver demand is also very high. A record 6,000 tonnes silver was imported into India last year – roughly 20% of global production.
 
TMR: What’s your advice for investors in the current junior resource market?
 
Kal Kotecha: I think a combination of five or six stocks in a portfolio with a mix of junior energy and mining equities is probably a good start. That’s what I do. It’s difficult for the average investor to follow more than five companies. 
 
TMR: Thank you for your insights, Kal.
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Sep 28

The Bells, the Bells!

Gold Price Comments Off on The Bells, the Bells!
From high art to Russia and US housing, the bells are ringing out…
 

TALK about ringing a bell! says Bill Bonner in his Diary of a Rogue Economist.
 
This ring-a-ding-ding comes from the New York Observer:
“Sales of contemporary art at public auctions surpassed $2 billion for the first time last year, the Paris-based arts-data organization Artprice said.
 
“The report tallied auction sales between July 2013 and July 2014, and it found that contemporary art sales grew 40% from the previous year. The number of big-ticket items that sold for over 10 million Euro ($12.8 million) more than doubled in the period.
 
“Those who follow the art market will remember the record-breaking Christie’s auction in November that saw buyers walk away with the most expensive publicly auctioned piece of art ever, Francis Bacon’s $142.4 million Three Studies of Lucian Freud (1969). That auction also minted Jeff Koons’ $58.4 million Balloon Dog (Orange) (1994-2000) as the most expensive piece by a living artist ever sold at auction…”
That’s another bad thing about being rich – you have to live with this stuff.
 
Even if you don’t own it, your new friends and neighbors will.
 
Unless you’re autistic – or a savant, like Warren Buffett – you’ll find it hard to avoid. Contemporary art and big, expensive houses are hugely popular among the wealthy elite. And most people are very susceptible to peer influence.
 
That is what creates investment opportunities, too. The lumpen investoriat – like the lumpen electorate – does not do much serious thinking.
 
Instead, it reacts emotionally and primitively.
 
It takes up positions that are too expensive. And then, in a panic, it stampedes away from them…leaving them too cheap. That’s when the bells start ringing.
 
Monday’s Financial Times, for example, chimed loudly.
 
It reported on page one that US private equity group Blackstone “calls it a day in Russia.”
 
This followed a withdrawal from Russia earlier this month by DMC Partners, a private equity group founded by former Goldman Sachs executives.
 
Further reporting revealed that the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development had “also suspended investments in the country.” And if that weren’t enough, “US group Carlyle has retreated from the market twice.”
 
Over on page 15, the FT continues to ring the bell, telling us that “Russia’s Gazprom could lose 18% of its revenues as a result of competition from US liquefied natural gas exports.”
 
On Tuesday, the bell ringing went on. A front page revealed that even the Rockefeller fortune was pulling out of fossil fuels.
“The effort to make oil, gas and coal investments as unpopular as tobacco stocks…gathered momentum…” the paper declared.
Geez, you’d have to be crazy to invest in Russian energy stocks now, right?
 
Yeah…crazy like a fox. Any time the newspapers give you nothing but reasons to sell, it’s time to buy. You can buy Gazprom for less than three times earnings…with a 5% dividend yield.
 
“And that’s post-theft,” says Rob Marstrand, chief investment strategist at our family wealth advisory, Bonner & Partners Family Office.
“You don’t have to worry about corruption…or politics…or sanctions,” he says. “It’s all in the price already.”
The news about Russian energy companies is all bad. It’s time to buy.
 
Meanwhile, what are people almost universally in favor of buying?
 
A house!
 
Poor people buy cheap houses. And when they get more money, they believe they should “trade up” to an expensive one.
 
Both rich and poor:
  • take advantage of mortgage deductions…
  • lock in low interest rates for the long term…
  • build equity…
  • improve their credit scores.
All by buying a house. But is it true? Is housing a good deal? Now? Ever?
 
A year ago, housing was one of our favorite investments. But our lead researcher at The Bill Bonner Letter, EB Tucker, thinks he hears the bell ringing for housing too.
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